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Opportunities for High School Students

Portage College will continue to monitor the pandemic situation closely and will make adjustments to program delivery depending on guidance from Alberta Health Services and the Ministry of Advanced Education.

Please check course delivery with our student advisors.

Below you will see the Course Listing for High School Students. Find your best course of action today!

Online learning is the perfect solution. Our expert instructors provide high-quality teaching using various delivery methods including video conferencing.

Portage College would like to welcome you to our vast selection of college opportunities. Entire programs, single course enrolments, to college camps, we have a perfect product for your learning needs.

Take a look at the booklet below for opportunities waiting for you!

Opportunities for High School Students - link to booklet

Dual Credit

Dual Credit provides opportunities for high school students to earn both high school and post-secondary credits at the same time.

To learn about Portage College’s Dual Credit opportunities, contact a Student Advisor today!

Dual credit can help students to:

  • start on their post-secondary education while still in high school
  • transition smoothly into post-secondary studies or start employment
  • may complete post-secondary with less financial debt

Students are responsible to purchase the necessary course text materials. To be eligible for enrollment, students must either have completed English 30 with a minimum of 60% or be currently enrolled in English 30 with a minimum of 70% in English 20.

NOTE TO STUDENTS: Please check with your high school to confirm they will accept and give you credit for the courses listed below. Some agreements with certain high schools will vary.

Opportunities for High School Students Course Selections

  • BIOLOGY 20

    Course ID: BIOL020

    Name: BIOLOGY 20

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Biology 20 is a course which will deal with the biosphere, cellular matter and energy flows, matter and exchange in ecosystems, and matter and energy exchange by the human organism. Students investigate the impact of science and technology on society and, at the same time, become aware of the roles and limitations of biology, science in general and of technology in problem solving in a societal context. This course encourages the development of positive attitudes that support the responsible acquisition and application of knowledge related to science and technology. It incorporates Aboriginal perspectives in order to develop in all students an appreciation of the cultural diversity and achievements of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. The three foundational components of science courses: attitudes, knowledge, science, technology and society (STS) as well as skills will be reflected in the learning outcomes of this course.

  • BIOLOGY 30

    Course ID: BIOL030

    Name: BIOLOGY 30

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Biology 30 is a course in which students obtain an understanding of systems of change in human organisms, reproduction and development, cells, chromosomes and DNA, as well as change in populations and communities. The impact and limitations of science and technology on society is also an integral part of this course. This course encourages the development of positive attitudes that support the responsible acquisition and application of knowledge related to science and technology. It incorporates Aboriginal perspectives in order to develop in all students an appreciation of the cultural diversity and achievements of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. The three foundational components of science courses: attitudes, knowledge, science, technology and society (STS) as well as skills will be reflected in the learning outcomes of this course.

  • CHEMISTRY 20

    Course ID: CHEM020

    Name: CHEMISTRY 20

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Chemistry 20 is a course which helps students to understand the chemistry principles behind the natural events they experience and the technology they use in their daily lives. Chemistry is the study of matter and its changes and each unit in Chemistry 20 uses a different context to investigate the nature of the matter and to examine its properties and changes. This course encourages the development of positive attitudes that support the responsible acquisition and application of knowledge related to science and technology. It incorporates Aboriginal perspectives in order to develop in all students an appreciation of the cultural diversity and achievements of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. The three foundational components of science courses: attitudes, knowledge, science, technology and society (STS) as well as skills will be reflected in the learning outcomes of this course.

  • CHEMISTRY 30

    Course ID: CHEM030

    Name: CHEMISTRY 30

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Chemistry 30 is a course which deals with organic chemistry, thermo chemical changes and electrochemical changes in acids and bases. In addition, Chemistry 30 explores the nature of science itself and develops the relationships. This course encourages the development of positive attitudes that support the responsible acquisition and application of knowledge related to science and technology. It incorporates Aboriginal perspectives in order to develop in all students an appreciation of the cultural diversity and achievements of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. The three foundational components of science courses: attitudes, knowledge, science, technology and society (STS) as well as skills will be reflected in the learning outcomes of this course.

  • CORRESPONDENCE

    Course ID: INF2090

    Name: CORRESPONDENCE

    Hours: 25

    Credits: 1

    Correspondence is a course in which students expand their rate of document production as they prepare various forms or correspondence in mailable form, using word processing software and database software.

  • DIGITAL PRESENTATION

    Course ID: INF1070

    Name: DIGITAL PRESENTATION

    Hours: 25

    Credits: 1

    Digital Presentation is a course in which students are introduced to Introductory Hypermedia (presentation) tools. Students develop skills with tools used for computerized presentations involving text, data, graphics, sound and animation.

  • DIVERSITY AWARENESS

    Course ID: DIAW101

    Name: DIVERSITY AWARENESS

    Hours: 27

    Credits: 0

    This introductory course is designed to allow the learner to develop an appreciation of the value of diversity within our culture. A unique combination of video and animation sets the path of exploration through a fictitious company. The interactive learning environment is designed for learner engagement and participation.

  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 10-2

    Course ID: ELA10-2

    Name: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 10-2

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    English 10-2 is designed to concentrate on the development of language arts’ strategies and skills to strengthen student use of language and understanding of text. The emphasis in this course is on verbal and non-verbal communication. It will focus on the examination of the five basic components of communication with an emphasis on developing reading speed/comprehension and writing accuracy/fluency. Students study short stories, essays, poems, novels and plays.

  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 20-1

    Course ID: ELA20-1

    Name: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 20-1

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    English Language Arts 20-1 is a course which is intended for students who demonstrate strength in their use of language and their understanding of print and non-print texts. Emphasis in this course is on literature studies. This course prepares students for English 30-1, which is intended for students who wish to enroll in degree programs at post-secondary institutions following graduation.

  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 20-2

    Course ID: ELA20-2

    Name: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 20-2

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    English Language Arts 20-2 is designed to concentrate on the development of language arts’ strategies and skills to strengthen student use of language and understanding of text. The emphasis in this course is on verbal and non-verbal communication skills. This course augments a learner’s competence in the five basic areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing with an emphasis on understanding and producing writing in common genres such as essays, summaries, and business letters. Students will edit and revise writing, study short stories, drama, poetry, non-fiction, novels, film and media. This course prepares students for the English Language Arts 30-2 course which is intended for students who wish to enroll in a diploma or certificate program at a post-secondary institution or who wish to enter the labour force following graduation.

  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 30-1

    Course ID: ELA30-1

    Name: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 30-1

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    English 30-1 is a five-credit course designed for students who wish to master the composition skills necessary for an analytical approach to literature (as emphasized in college/university programs). It examines the traditional literary genres and also explores visual media. This course challenges students to deal with abstract concepts with sophistication. Students analyze short stories, non-fiction, poetry, drama, the novel, film and media.

  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 30-2

    Course ID: ELA30-2

    Name: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 30-2

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    English 30-2 is a five credit course with a functional orientation emphasizing clear skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing. Students undertake communication activities as they study short stories, non-fiction, poetry, modern and Shakespearean plays, films, and novels. This course helps prepare students for further training in college diploma programs or for situations they may encounter in the world of work. Students will study the novel, short stories, poetry and drama, and learn to represent ideas visually.

  • GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 20

    Course ID: GPSYCH020

    Name: GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 20

    Hours: 75

    Credits: 3

    General Psychology 20 is a course designed to develop within the student the skills and understandings that make it possible for more effective living in our complex environment. The course will focus on the scientific approach to understanding individual human behavior.

  • JOB MAINTENANCE

    Course ID: CTR2010

    Name: JOB MAINTENANCE

    Hours: 25

    Credits: 1

    Students acquire knowledge about workplace requirements, rights and responsibilities and relate this knowledge to personal career/employment expectations.

  • JOB PREPARATION

    Course ID: CTR1010

    Name: JOB PREPARATION

    Hours: 27

    Credits: 1

    Students develop successful employment search skills and a personal employment search portfolio.

  • MATHEMATICS PREPARATION 10

    Course ID: MAT1041

    Name: MATHEMATICS PREPARATION 10

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Mathematics 10 Preparation is a course which is designed to cover the basic algebra skills required for high school math courses. Topics include number systems, fractions, algebraic expressions, patterns and equations, problem solving, exponent laws, measurement, and geometry.

  • MATH 10C

    Course ID: MATH10C

    Name: MATH 10C

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Math 10C is designed to provide students with mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills. It prepares students to solve problems, communicate and reason mathematically, become mathematically literate, and make informed decisions as contributors to society. The goal of Math 10C is to provide a starting point to develop the attitudes, knowledge, skills and understandings needed for specific post-secondary programs or entry into the workforce. It prepares students for either the Math-1 or the Math-2 course sequence beginning at the grade 11 level. The topics included are measurement and trigonometry, polynomial factoring and operations, linear relations and functions, and systems of linear relations.

  • MATH 10-3

    Course ID: MATH10-3

    Name: MATH 10-3

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Mathematics 10-3 is a course which provides students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into the majority of trades and for direct entry into the work force. Topics include algebra, geometry, measurement, trigonometry and finance. Math 10-3 prepares students to take Math 20-3.

  • MATH 20-2

    Course ID: MATH20-2

    Name: MATH 20-2

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    The Mathematics 20-2 is a course that is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for post-secondary studies in programs that do not require the study of calculus. Topics include: measurement, geometry, number and logical reasoning, statistics, and relations and functions.

  • MATH 20-3

    Course ID: MATH20-3

    Name: MATH 20-3

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Mathematics 20-3 is a course which is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into the majority of trades and for direct entry into the work force. Topics include measurement, geometry, numbers, algebra, and statistics.

  • MATH 30-2

    Course ID: MATH30-2

    Name: MATH 30-2

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Mathematics 30-2 is a course which emphasizes the needs of students to solve problems, communicate and reason mathematically, make connections between mathematics and its applications, become mathematically literate, appreciate and value mathematics and make informed decisions as a contributor to society.

  • PERSONAL PSYCHOLOGY 20

    Course ID: PPSYCH020

    Name: PERSONAL PSYCHOLOGY 20

    Hours: 75

    Credits: 3

    Physics 20 is a course which emphasizes the science themes: Change and Systems through a study of kinematics and dynamics; Energy and Equilibrium by examining uniform circular motion and mechanical energy, work and power; and Energy and Matter by investigation simple harmonic motion and mechanical waves. This course encourages the development of positive attitudes that support the responsible acquisition and application of knowledge related to science and technology. It incorporates Aboriginal perspectives in order to develop in all students an appreciation of the cultural diversity and achievements of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. The three foundational components of science courses: attitudes, knowledge, science, technology and society (STS) as well as skills will be reflected in the learning outcomes of this course.

  • PHYSICS 20

    Course ID: PHYS020

    Name: PHYSICS 20

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Physics 20 is a course which emphasizes the science themes: Change and Systems through a study of kinematics and dynamics; Energy and Equilibrium by examining uniform circular motion and mechanical energy, work and power; and Energy and Matter by investigation simple harmonic motion and mechanical waves. This course encourages the development of positive attitudes that support the responsible acquisition and application of knowledge related to science and technology. It incorporates Aboriginal perspectives in order to develop in all students an appreciation of the cultural diversity and achievements of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. The three foundational components of science courses: attitudes, knowledge, science, technology and society (STS) as well as skills will be reflected in the learning outcomes of this course.

  • READING 15

    Course ID: READ15

    Name: READING 15

    Hours: 75

    Credits: 3

    Reading 15 is a course, which is designed to concentrate on the development of language arts strategies and skills to strengthen student use of language and understanding of text. In Reading 15 students will engage with a wide range of texts including but not limited to those that they need to be able to read in order to hone the competencies necessary to achieve success in their courses across the curriculum and in their lives beyond school. This course emphasizes the importance of scaffolding to promote increasingly independent literacy practices. Students will receive orientation to reading habits, writing processes, oral communication, and thinking skills. Students will develop confidence and motivation to succeed in active reading in school and daily life.

  • REPORTS

    Course ID: INF2100

    Name: REPORTS

    Hours: 25

    Credits: 1

    Reports is a course in which students expand their rate of production as they prepare various reports and manuscripts in mailable form.

  • SCIENCE 10

    Course ID: SCIE010

    Name: SCIENCE 10

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Science 10 is an integrated academic course, which helps students better understand and apply the fundamental concepts and skills common to life science, physical science, and earth science. It is also designed to show the link between science and technology and our society. Science 10 is a prerequisite for all 20 level science courses. This course encourages the development of positive attitudes that support the responsible acquisition and application of knowledge related to science and technology. It incorporates Aboriginal perspectives in order to develop in all students an appreciation of the cultural diversity and achievements of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. The three foundational components of science courses: attitudes, knowledge, science, technology and society (STS) as well as skills will be reflected in the learning outcomes of this course.

  • SOCIAL STUDIES 30-1

    Course ID: SOCS30-1

    Name: SOCIAL STUDIES 30-1

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Social Studies 30-1 is a course in which students will examine the origins and complexities of ideologies and examine multiple perspectives regarding the principles of classical and modern liberalism. An analysis of various political and economic systems will allow students to assess the viability of the principles of liberalism. Developing understandings of the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship will encourage students to respond to emergent global issues. This course incorporates Aboriginal perspectives in order to develop in all students an appreciation of the cultural diversity and achievements of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples.

  • SOCIAL STUDIES 30-2

    Course ID: SOCS30-2

    Name: SOCIAL STUDIES 30-2

    Hours: 125

    Credits: 5

    Social Studies 30-2 is a course in which students will examine the origins, values, and components of competing ideologies. They will explore multiple perspectives regarding relationship among individualism, liberalism, common good and collectivism. An examination of various political and economic systems will allow students to determine the viability of the values of liberalism. Developing understanding of the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship will encourage students to respond to emergent global issues. It incorporates Aboriginal perspectives in order to develop in all students an appreciation of the cultural diversity and achievements of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples.

  • SPREADSHEET 1

    Course ID: INF1060

    Name: SPREADSHEET 1

    Hours: 25

    Credits: 1

    Spreadsheets 1 is a course in which students have an opportunity to use basic functions and commands in spreadsheet software for general data manipulation and personal recordkeeping. Classroom instruction or independent study are the instructional strategies for this course.

  • SPREADSHEET 2

    Course ID: INF2080

    Name: SPREADSHEET 2

    Hours: 25

    Credits: 1

    Spreadsheets 2 is a course in which students have an opportunity to build advanced worksheets in spreadsheet software for data manipulation and personal record keeping.

  • WORD PROCESSING 1

    Course ID: INF1030

    Name: WORD PROCESSING 1

    Hours: 25

    Credits: 1

    Word Processing 1 is a course in which students develop skill in using basic commands and functions in word processing software, including document editing, and the formatting and printing of reports, correspondence and tables suitable for personal use applications. Classroom instruction or independent study is the instructional strategies for this course.

  • WORD PROCESSING 2

    Course ID: INF2050

    Name: WORD PROCESSING 2

    Hours: 25

    Credits: 1

    Word Processing 2 is a course in which students develop skills that expand the student’s word processing software commands and functions to produce mailable reports, correspondence (including letters and memos) and tables from rough draft copy.

  • WORD PROCESSING 3

    Course ID: INF3060

    Name: WORD PROCESSING 3

    Hours: 25

    Credits: 1

    Word Processing 3 is a course which develops advanced skills in word processing software for documents used in the workplace; mailable word processing documents.

  • ACCOUNTING I

    Course ID: ACCT106

    Name: ACCOUNTING I

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    Within the conceptual framework of accounting, including Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, students are introduced to the accounting equation and the effect various transactions have on it. An introduction to ledgers, journalizing transactions, trial balance, income statement and balance sheet are presented. The accounting cycle, accounting for merchandise operations, internal control, accounts receivable, accounts payable, cash control, and the valuation of inventories are examined. Prerequisites: Math 30 (Applied or Pure), Math 33, Math 30-1, or Math 30-2

  • ACCOUNTING II

    Course ID: ACCT107

    Name: ACCOUNTING II

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    Capital assets are discussed with reference to recording acquisition cost, amortization, exchanges and disposal. Short-term and long-term liabilities, partnerships, corporations, share capital, and the statement of cash flows/cash flow analysis are introduced and examined individually. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles are examined through-out the course, as they relate to the specific subject areas. As a final integration, the student will study the analysis of financial statements. Prerequisite – ACCT 106

  • BUSINESS LAW

    Course ID: BUSL261

    Name: BUSINESS LAW

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    This course presents legal topics relevant to business, including ways to manage common legal risks. An introduction to the Canadian legal system presents sources of law, the court system, the litigation process, and alternatives to litigation.

    Tort law includes a study of intentional torts, business torts, negligence, and professional liability. Insurance law covers basic concepts of the insurance industry, and how to manage common risks in business. Basic forms of business organizations are delineated, with a focus on the rights and responsibilities of individuals involved in sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations.

    Contract law details how contracts are created, elements of a binding contract, common contractual issues and defects, how contracts are discharged, and contractual remedies. An overview of the Sale of Goods Act will complete the study of contracts. Employment law describes the employer/employee relationship, the rights and duties of the parties involved, and common issues that may arise in the employment relationship. Intellectual property law discusses how businesses can generate value from ideas and the laws that seek to balance competing business interests.

    Secured transactions look at risk assessment and legal obligations of creditors when securing debt and practices that have been developed in the marketplace to manage that risk through security interests and guarantees.

    PREREQUISITES: ELA 30-1, ELA 30-2, or English 33, or COMM 121

  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS I

    Course ID: COMM121

    Name: BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS I

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    This course introduces the communications model and the complexity of the communication process. Students learn to apply effective business writing strategies and techniques in memos, e-mails, and letters, to express good news, bad news, and persuasive messages. Letters and memos will be assigned in class, and completed within prescribed time limits. Students will use word processing software to compose, edit, and revise assignments. As well, students will learn and practice fundamental presentation skills, including the effective use of visuals and presentation software. Creating and maintaining goodwill with audiences is emphasized throughout the course.

    Prerequisites: ELA 30-1, ELA 30-2, or English 33

  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS II

    Course ID: COMM131

    Name: BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS II

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    Students will add to their knowledge of the communication process and its typical business applications by applying the techniques learned in COMM 121, with a focus on business reports. Emphasis will be placed on research skills, problem determination, critical thinking, and source documentation. Word processing and other computer software will be used to compose, edit, revise, and enhance assignments with visual elements. Presentation skills learned in COMM 121 will be expanded upon and applied to a longer business presentation. Job search skills will detail competitive strategies for finding work, with a focus on how to produce a targeted resume and cover letter, and how to prepare for a job interview. Prerequisites: COMM 121

  • BUSINESS MATHEMATICS

    Course ID: MATH117

    Name: BUSINESS MATHEMATICS

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the fundamental principles and concepts of business mathematics, and to develop their abilities to apply these principles and concepts to solve practical business problems, particularly in marketing and in finance. This course includes a lab component to analyze business math problems with spreadsheets. Prerequisites – Math 30 (Applied or Pure), Math 33, Math 30-1, or Math 30-2

  • DIVERSITY AWARENESS

    Course ID: DIAW101

    Name: DIVERSITY AWARENESS

    Hours: 27

    Credits: 0

    This introductory course is designed to allow the learner to develop an appreciation of the value of diversity within our culture. A unique combination of video and animation sets the path of exploration through a fictitious company. The interactive learning environment is designed for learner engagement and participation.

  • MICROECONOMICS

    Course ID: ECON186

    Name: MICROECONOMICS

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    The question of how individuals and firms use their resources to attain certain economic goals is examined. The central problem of scarcity is introduced. A brief study of how different economic systems try to solve this problem is undertaken. The market system is investigated as to how supply, demand, and price determine what and how much is produced. Effective decision-making in the marketplace is also examined. Prerequisites: Math 30 (Applied or Pure), Math 33, Math 30-1, or Math 30-2

  • MACROECONOMICS

    Course ID: ECON187

    Name: MACROECONOMICS

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    The overall health of the economy is the prime focus of this course. Gross domestic product, unemployment rates, inflation rates, interest rates, the balance of payments and exchange rates, and the money supply as measures of economic health are studied. This provides a framework for analyzing government monetary and fiscal policies. International economic issues including free trade and foreign investment are also examined. Wherever appropriate, applications to current events are introduced. PREREQUISITES: MATH 30 (Not Math 30-3) or 60% on the Business Math test and ENG 30, strongly recommended ECON 186

  • MARKETING

    Course ID: MARK166

    Name: MARKETING

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    This is an introductory course covering the fundamental principles and concepts of marketing. Major emphasis is placed on the marketing mix and its strategic application to an increasingly complex business environment. In particular, the areas of product, promotion, price, and distribution are examined as they relate to the achievement of company objectives.

    Prerequisites: ELA 30-1, ELA 30-2, or English 33 or COMM 121

  • ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

    Course ID: ORGB193

    Name: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    Organizational Behaviour is the study of what people think, feel and do in and around organizations. Organizational Behaviour is not just for managers; the concepts explored in this course are useful to anyone who works. This course builds student knowledge starting at an individual level, moving on to a team level, and finally finishing at the organizational level. Students will develop an understanding of how Organizational Behaviour concepts affect themselves and others, and how those impact the organization's bottom line.

    Prerequisites: ELA 30-1, ELA 30-2, or English 33

  • COMPUTER SCIENCE CODING AND ROBOTICS

    Course ID: CSCR101

    Name: COMPUTER SCIENCE CODING AND ROBOTICS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Welcome to this project-based course that will have you exploring the areas of computer science, coding, and robotics. This class will challenge your problem-solving abilities, and equip you with an understanding of how some of the computer programs you use on a regular basis were made. In addition to building fundamental programming skills, you’ll be developing projects that have both digital and physical aspects, driven by a Micro:bit single-board computer, and a set of basic robotics electronics components.

    Prerequisite: None

  • GLOBAL ISSUES

    Course ID: NRES208

    Name: GLOBAL ISSUES

    Hours: 80

    Credits: 3

    Global issues is designed to give students a deeper understanding of the socio-environmental challenges and opportunities we face on various scales.  The course uses western science and Indigenous ways of knowing to examine a range of environmental issues.  Students will learn various theoretical and practical approaches to environmental management and planning issues.  Specific topics include renewable and non-renewable energy use, climate change, biodiversity and conservation, environmental politics, food and water security, environmental planning and management techniques, and urban development.  These topics will be delved into from a regional, national and global scale.

  • HUMAN DEVELOPMENT I

    Course ID: ECDE100

    Name: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    In this course the learner will explore the major theories of human development and will focus specifically on birth to age twelve. Areas of study will include physical, cognitive, emotional and social development.

  • INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS I

    Course ID: MATH100

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course serves as an introduction to the methods and applications of single variable calculus. Limits are used to investigate continuity and asymptotes, as well as define the processes of differentiation and integration in a precise manner. Students learn to calculate, interpret, and apply derivatives and integrals to solve rate of change problems and to accurately depict the behavior of a function. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in MATH 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP

    Course ID: ENTR105

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Entrepreneurship is a Moodle supported course designed to assist students to evaluate the business skills and commitment necessary to successfully operate an entrepreneurial venture. Students will review the challenges and rewards of entrepreneurship. Through assessments and assignments, students will learn about themselves, explore their entrepreneurial idea, and determine how entrepreneurship can play a role in their lives. Additionally, students will be introduced to e-commerce, global and social entrepreneurship. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

    Course ID: PSYC104

    Name: INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is a prerequisite to other psychology courses at Portage College. This Introductory psychology course is intended to inspire an interest in, and an appreciation for, the field of psychology.  Topics in this course include the history of psychological science, psychological research methods, the structure and function of the brain and nervous system, learning, sensation, perception, memory, consciousness, thought, and language. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Course ID: SOCI101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of Sociology and current sociological trends and issues. The course provides an overview of sociological concepts, perspectives, processes and institutions in a Canadian context with particular emphasis on various issues impacting Canadian society. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS & RESEARCH METHODS

    Course ID: STAT141

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS & RESEARCH METHODS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This introductory statistics course provides students in a variety of disciplines with basic knowledge regarding the theory and application of statistics. Prerequisites: 60% in MATH 30-1 or Math 30-2 and 60% in ELA 30-1

  • ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

    Course ID: ORGB193

    Name: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    Organizational Behaviour is the study of what people think, feel and do in and around organizations. Organizational Behaviour is not just for managers; the concepts explored in this course are useful to anyone who works. This course builds student knowledge starting at an individual level, moving on to a team level, and finally finishing at the organizational level. Students will develop an understanding of how Organizational Behaviour concepts affect themselves and others, and how those impact the organization's bottom line.

    Prerequisites: ELA 30-1, ELA 30-2, or English 33

  • PERSONAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

    Course ID: HEED105

    Name: PERSONAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will introduce you to the physical, social, mental, occupational, emotional, environmental and spiritual dimensions of personal health and wellness. These dimensions are described within the context of the Canadian Health Care System and your own individual community. Topics include primary health care, nutrition, exercise, stress management, weight management, eating disorders, common health issues and their prevention. You will be expected to integrate knowledge of the seven dimensions of health and apply this knowledge to a self-analysis of your own health and physical fitness. Finally, you will incorporate change management theory to develop, implement and evaluate a personal wellness plan. The intent of this course is to promote a healthy lifestyle. By examining determinants of health, the current health care system, the seven dimensions of health and applying these concepts to your own lifestyle, you will be better equipped to function as role models and act as change agents for health promotion in your community. Prerequisite 60% in ELA 30-1

  • TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR TEACHING & LEARNING

    Course ID: COMA200

    Name: TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR TEACHING & LEARNING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Technology Tools for Teaching and Learning will help prepare students to develop and integrate project-based learning skills into the classroom. Students will examine the Information and Communication Technology Outcomes Program of Studies as published by Alberta Learning, and are expected to develop modules that integrate the ICT Outcomes using the Internet, Word Processing, Spreadsheet, Database, and Multimedia application software. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • HUMAN DEVELOPMENT I

    Course ID: ECDE100

    Name: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    In this course the learner will explore the major theories of human development and will focus specifically on birth to age twelve. Areas of study will include physical, cognitive, emotional and social development.

  • HUMAN DEVELOPMENT I

    Course ID: ECDE100

    Name: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    In this course the learner will explore the major theories of human development and will focus specifically on birth to age twelve. Areas of study will include physical, cognitive, emotional and social development.

  • ANATOMY I

    Course ID: BIOL230

    Name: ANATOMY I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an in-depth study of the structures of the human body and their interrelationships using a systems approach. The correlations between structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) are noted. Major topics include body organization, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, endocrine, urinary and reproductive systems, the general and special senses, and human development. This course is designed to prepare students in medical fields of study for advanced courses in their respective fields, as well as other university transfer students.

  • COMPUTER SCIENCE CODING AND ROBOTICS

    Course ID: CSCR101

    Name: COMPUTER SCIENCE CODING AND ROBOTICS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Welcome to this project-based course that will have you exploring the areas of computer science, coding, and robotics. This class will challenge your problem-solving abilities, and equip you with an understanding of how some of the computer programs you use on a regular basis were made. In addition to building fundamental programming skills, you’ll be developing projects that have both digital and physical aspects, driven by a Micro:bit single-board computer, and a set of basic robotics electronics components.

    Prerequisite: None

  • DRAMATIC PROCESS I

    Course ID: DRMA101

    Name: DRAMATIC PROCESS I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    An introduction to the process of acting and dramatic form through the process of improvisation. This workshop-based course will explore speech and movement improvisation with an emphasis on imaginative development and introduction to the process of acting and to dramatic form. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY FOR TEACHING

    Course ID: EDPY200

    Name: EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY FOR TEACHING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course examines the psychology of learning and instruction. The theoretical basis of human development, learning, and teaching will each be explored, providing a comprehensive background to the art of education and effective teaching. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • GENDER AGE & CULTURE

    Course ID: ANTH110

    Name: GENDER AGE & CULTURE

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides a general overview of the cross-cultural variation in social roles related to gender, age and culture. Gender and age roles are culturally constructed in relation to social structure and political systems. Human development, including the social roles of children, adolescents, adults and elders will be examined. Also explored is human variation in relation to sex and development. In this class, we will discuss how societies organize sex and gender differences, and what it means to be a man, woman or third gender in different cultures. Gender roles will be examined in relation to other cultural features, such as status, health, sexuality and fertility. We will also explore the impact of gender differences as part of social organization with respect to culture change and globalization.

    PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES:60% in ELA 30-1 

  • HIGHER ARITHMETIC

    Course ID: MATH160

    Name: HIGHER ARITHMETIC

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Math 160 is required for elementary teachers (education majors), critical thinking and problem solving is stressed throughout the course. Conceptual understanding of elementary number theory, set theory, numeration systems and their operations algorithms is the subject of the study; as well as the preparation and presentation of Math Fair. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1 and Math 30

  • INDIVIDUAL & SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

    Course ID: PSYC105

    Name: INDIVIDUAL & SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is the second half of the Introductory Psychology course sequence. It will cover such topics as human intellect, human development from birth to old age, motivation, emotion, personality, social psychological processes, stress and health, as well as mental disorders and their treatments. This course is an overview of these diverse topics, most of which can be studied in one or more complete courses. Prerequisites: PSYC104

  • INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY I

    Course ID: CHEM101

    Name: INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY I

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    CHEM 101 is an Introductory Chemistry course. It may be referred to as Introductory University Chemistry. This course is designed for both Chemistry majors and non-majors. Key concepts include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter and chemistry of the elements. This course includes a laboratory component designed to provide experience in experimental techniques and accurate measurement. The course prerequisite is a basic knowledge of chemistry equivalent to the Alberta’s Chemistry 30 high school curriculum. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in CHEM 30

  • INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY II

    Course ID: CHEM102

    Name: INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY II

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    CHEM 102 is the second Introductory Chemistry course, following CHEM 101. Therefore, CHEM 101 is the prerequisite course. Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, coordination chemistry and electrochemistry. Key concepts such as reaction rates, rate laws, Arrhenius equation, reaction mechanism and catalysis will be discussed. The course will also present gas-phase equilibria, ICE table and equilibrium calculations, acid-base and complex ion equilibria, solubility and precipitation. In addition, second and third laws of thermodynamics, entropy and spontaneity, coordination compounds, crystal field theory as applied to colour and magnetic properties of coordination compounds, voltaic cells, cell potentials, free energy, electrical work, Nernst equation, batteries, corrosion and electrolysis will be covered. Prerequisite – CHEM 101.

  • INTRODUCTORY COMPOSITION

    Course ID: ENGL102

    Name: INTRODUCTORY COMPOSITION

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course helps students to develop the academic writing skills they use throughout their university studies. Students learn to identify good writing, and develop needed research, analytical, and organizational skills. Starting with building good sentences and paragraphs, the research essay is the most important genre in this course. By analyzing, summarizing, synthesizing, and critiquing a variety of texts, students learn how to develop their own analyses and arguments with appropriate and correctly documented primary and secondary sources. Readings by or about indigenous and minority peoples form no less than 50% of the readings in this course. A review of grammar and sentence structure is a key component of this course. Students are advised to choose a research topic in line with their career goals. Prerequisite 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTORY FRENCH I

    Course ID: FREN101

    Name: INTRODUCTORY FRENCH I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    French 101 is the first semester of an introductory French program. This course will help you to learn how to use the French language to communicate about various topics that are relevant to your daily activities, as well as to the realities of the world in which you live. Both classroom activities and major exams will target all four language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. You will acquire basic grammatical and lexical knowledge that will allow you to carry out a wide-range of communicative tasks. The language learning process will occur within a cultural framework in which you will be introduced to various French-speaking peoples from Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

  • INTRODUCTORY FRENCH II

    Course ID: FREN102

    Name: INTRODUCTORY FRENCH II

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    French 102 is the second semester of an introductory French program which focuses on the French language and Francophone cultures throughout the world. This course is designed to facilitate the further development of your communication skills in French and to give you a balance of all four language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. By the end of the semester, you will be able to initiate and sustain interactions in French, understand the main ideas of what you hear, see, and read in French, and express yourself clearly in written French. In addition to acquiring intermediate-level grammatical and linguistic knowledge, you will also gain a deeper understanding of diverse aspects of French-speaking cultures. Prerequisites: FREN 101

  • INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

    Course ID: PSYC104

    Name: INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is a prerequisite to other psychology courses at Portage College. This Introductory psychology course is intended to inspire an interest in, and an appreciation for, the field of psychology.  Topics in this course include the history of psychological science, psychological research methods, the structure and function of the brain and nervous system, learning, sensation, perception, memory, consciousness, thought, and language. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS I

    Course ID: MATH100

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course serves as an introduction to the methods and applications of single variable calculus. Limits are used to investigate continuity and asymptotes, as well as define the processes of differentiation and integration in a precise manner. Students learn to calculate, interpret, and apply derivatives and integrals to solve rate of change problems and to accurately depict the behavior of a function. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in MATH 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO CELL BIOLOGY

    Course ID: BIOL101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO CELL BIOLOGY

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Major topics include the movement of energy, matter and information within and among cells. Key concepts such as cell theory and structure, energy transformations, reproduction, genetic variability, molecular genetics and applications in biotechnology are covered. PREREQUISITES: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in BIO 30

  • INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA AND TO POETRY

    Course ID: ENGL106

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA AND TO POETRY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    English 106 is designed to teach critical writing, critical reading, and critical thinking while studying canonical literary texts from the sixteenth to the twenty-first centuries. This course combines the study of literary works with instructional texts to teach students to express themselves more clearly in writing and in speech. The creators of this course also hope that students develop an appreciation for fine literary works. This course will present plays and poems from a variety of historical periods and from a variety of cultural contexts. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of correct writing style, rhetorical skills, and thinking skills required for academic study. A minimum of thirty percent of class time will be devoted to writing instruction, which may take any or all of the following forms: grammar and punctuation instruction, informal writing exercises, writing workshops, stylistic and rhetorical analysis, research skills, peer editing, and group writing projects. The total amount of writing will be no less than 3,000 words. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SCIENCES: GEOLOGY & GEOMORPHOLOGY

    Course ID: EASC101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SCIENCES: GEOLOGY & GEOMORPHOLOGY

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    EASC101 introduces students to basic concepts of physical geology. Following an introduction to minerals as the basic building blocks of earth materials, igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks are examined. This is followed by a detailed look at the earth's internal structure and processes that occur within it. Students are acquainted with the theory of plate tectonics as a unifying concept in geology after which crustal tectonics and resulting deformation structures are explored. Earth surface processes are also examined including weathering, mass movement, surface water movement, glaciations, wind action, and desert processes. The final part of the course introduces students to the application of remote sensing and GIS in the earth sciences. PREREQUISITES: Completion of first-year NRT or 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in BIO 30 or 60% in CHEM 30

  • INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY AND DIGITAL ART

    Course ID: PHTO 101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY AND DIGITAL ART

    Hours: 75

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals and techniques of digital photography including: camera controls and operation, camera equipment and accessories, basics of digital camera technology and software, processing and printing of photographs, and presentation of photographic artworks. Students will also learn about the history of photography through examining the artwork of various photographers and the evolution of various photographic processes utilized by these artists.

    Prerequisites: Students are required to provide their own digital camera for this course. The digital camera can be a DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) camera, mirrorless camera, bridge camera, or a point-and-shoot camera. Digital cameras for this course must also have a flash and manual settings to control aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. Please contact Portage College Fine Arts for further information.

  • INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Course ID: SOCI101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of Sociology and current sociological trends and issues. The course provides an overview of sociological concepts, perspectives, processes and institutions in a Canadian context with particular emphasis on various issues impacting Canadian society. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS & RESEARCH METHODS

    Course ID: STAT141

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS & RESEARCH METHODS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This introductory statistics course provides students in a variety of disciplines with basic knowledge regarding the theory and application of statistics. Prerequisites: 60% in MATH 30-1 or Math 30-2 and 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I

    Course ID: ARTH101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is an introduction to the history of visual arts and design from the earliest evidence to the fourteenth century. The concentration will be on the history of art in the Near East and Europe: Western Art. Since there has been contact between these areas and the Indian sub-continent and the Far East, and since these have been influences on the later history of Western Art, the art of Asian cultures during this period will also be briefly considered. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART II

    Course ID: ARTH102

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART II

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an introduction to the history of visual arts and design from 14th Century to the present day. While the course can be taken on its own, it also follows on from ARTH 101, which surveys the history of visual arts and design from the earliest times up to the 14th Century. ARTH 102 starts at a period that is academically considered to be the origin of our modern age, and follows the development of the visual arts to the types of art, design, and architecture that are being created around us in our contemporary world. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE MOVEMENT ACTIVITIES TO CHILDREN

    Course ID: PHED200

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE MOVEMENT ACTIVITIES TO CHILDREN

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course explores the study of developmentally appropriate movement activities for children. Students participate in, and work with children in a variety of physical activities in recreational, educational and sport environments. Prerequisite: ELA 30-1.

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE NOVEL AND THE SHORT STORY

    Course ID: ENGL108

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE NOVEL AND THE SHORT STORY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    English 108 is designed to teach critical writing, critical reading, and critical thinking while studying canonical literary texts from the eighteenth to the twentieth-first centuries. This course combines the study of literary works with instructional texts to teach students to express themselves more clearly in writing and in speech. The creators of this course also hope that students develop an appreciation for fine literary works. This course will present novels and short stories from a variety of historical periods, and from a variety of cultural contexts. Particular emphasis will be place of the development of correct writing style, rhetorical skills, and thinking skills required for academic study. A minimum of thirty percent of class time will be devoted to writing instruction, which may take any or all of the following forms: formal written assignments, informal writing exercises, writing workshops, stylistic and rhetorical analysis, research skills, peer editing, group writing projects, and ungraded writing. Students will write two formal essays that will be graded, including an analytical and a research paper. The total amount of writing will be no less than 3,000 words. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or other 3 credit junior English

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE PROFESSION OF TEACHING

    Course ID: EDUC250

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE PROFESSION OF TEACHING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course introduces prospective teachers to the complexity of their future professional roles in today’s schools. Students will be encouraged to consider teaching from “the other side of the desk”, and will leave familiar with the intricate framework in which teachers work, and the expectations of various stakeholders. They will gain a knowledge base on which future Education courses will build, and will be introduced to theories of learning and teaching. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • ORGANISMS IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    Course ID: BIOL102

    Name: ORGANISMS IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed for both Biology majors and non-majors, and explores the principal lineages of organisms on earth: bacteria and archaea, fungi, protists, plants and animals. The relationships of these organisms to their environment and their influence in shaping that environment are examined. Evolutionary pathways and their influence on the diversity of extinct and extant organisms and the classification schemes that we use to distinguish them are discussed. The role that organisms (including humans) have played in the development and maintenance of major ecosystem processes are also studied. This course includes a lab component. PREREQUISITES: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in BIO 30

  • PERSONAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

    Course ID: HEED105

    Name: PERSONAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will introduce you to the physical, social, mental, occupational, emotional, environmental and spiritual dimensions of personal health and wellness. These dimensions are described within the context of the Canadian Health Care System and your own individual community. Topics include primary health care, nutrition, exercise, stress management, weight management, eating disorders, common health issues and their prevention. You will be expected to integrate knowledge of the seven dimensions of health and apply this knowledge to a self-analysis of your own health and physical fitness. Finally, you will incorporate change management theory to develop, implement and evaluate a personal wellness plan. The intent of this course is to promote a healthy lifestyle. By examining determinants of health, the current health care system, the seven dimensions of health and applying these concepts to your own lifestyle, you will be better equipped to function as role models and act as change agents for health promotion in your community. Prerequisite 60% in ELA 30-1

  • PHYSIOLOGY I

    Course ID: BIOL231

    Name: PHYSIOLOGY I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides a study of the overall function of the human body. Major topics include fundamental chemistry, homeostasis, cytology and cell physiology, cell signaling and communication, and muscle, nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, endocrine, urinary, and reproductive physiology, as well as fundamental genetics as it applies to human physiology. This course is designed to prepare students in medical fields of study for advanced courses in their respective fields, as well as other university transfer students.

    Pre/Corequisite 60% in ELA 30-1 and BIO 30 BIOL230

  • PLAY ANALYSIS

    Course ID: DRMA102

    Name: PLAY ANALYSIS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    DRMA 102 is an in-depth look into the key elements and concepts of Play Analysis. This course introduces students to a variety of approaches when analyzing plays. It will focus on elements of genre, structure, style, character, theme, language, imagery, and dramatic action, among other topics pertinent to dramatic narrative and structure. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • RACE & RACISM IN THE MODERN WORLD

    Course ID: ANTH103

    Name: RACE & RACISM IN THE MODERN WORLD

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course gives an anthropological perspective on how the concept of race has been used to understand biological and cultural variation among humans. Issues and topics discussed will include multiculturalism, ethnic identity, prejudice, ethnocentrism, racism, eugenics and the persistence of ethnic identity in the face of globalization. Case studies from different parts of the world are used to illustrate these concepts, including current issues of interest in Canada. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR TEACHING & LEARNING

    Course ID: COMA200

    Name: TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR TEACHING & LEARNING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Technology Tools for Teaching and Learning will help prepare students to develop and integrate project-based learning skills into the classroom. Students will examine the Information and Communication Technology Outcomes Program of Studies as published by Alberta Learning, and are expected to develop modules that integrate the ICT Outcomes using the Internet, Word Processing, Spreadsheet, Database, and Multimedia application software. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • THE EARLY MODERN WORLD

    Course ID: HIST101

    Name: THE EARLY MODERN WORLD

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    History 101 is intended to introduce students both to the content of early modern world history and to the study of history at the university level. In content, the course traces the development of the world from around 1400 to around 1800. As with any history, the focus of the classes and readings is selective; we cannot hope to cover every society and nation in equal depth, but must attempt to negotiate a balance between specific historical detail and broad themes. In the process, students will be expected to develop and utilise skills needed for history as an academic discipline, such as the ability to remember when things happened and how they fit together, the ability to read historical texts carefully and to ask questions of those texts, and the ability to express themselves clearly and coherently in writing. Ideally, students should come away from this course not simply knowing “facts,” but equipped to think historically about the world in which we live, and armed with skills of critical analysis and expression that they will find applicable to many areas of endeavour aside from history. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • THE MODERN WORLD

    Course ID: HIST102

    Name: THE MODERN WORLD

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    History 102 is intended to introduce students both to the content of modern world history and to the study of history at the university level. In content, the course traces the development of the modern world since around 1800. As with any history, the focus of the classes and readings is selective; we cannot hope to cover every society and nation in equal depth, but must attempt to negotiate a balance between specific historical detail and broad themes. In the process, students will be expected to develop and utilise skills needed for history as an academic discipline, such as the ability to remember when things happened and how they fit together, the ability to read historical texts carefully and to ask questions of those texts, and the ability to express themselves clearly and coherently in writing. Ideally, students should come away from this course not simply knowing “facts,” but equipped to think historically about the world in which we live, and armed with skills of critical analysis and expression that they will find applicable to many areas of endeavour aside from history. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

We acknowledge that Portage College’s service region is on the traditional lands of First Nation Peoples, the owners of Treaty 6, 8 and 10, which are also homelands to the Métis people. We honour the history and culture of all people who first lived and gathered in these lands.
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